Mar 12 2012

Fired & Replaced by Neice of Boss’s Golf Buddy!

What do you do when an otherwise great boss blindsides you with the news that you are no longer an employee of his? Well I don’t know what others have done but me, I took the strong, silent route. Seriously. You could’ve knocked me over with a feather and I was sitting down when he told me. I don’t recall the exact words he used, but the tone of it was along the lines of, “Well you’ve been great to work with but you don’t have that much experience and well, we need someone who can take initiative here. So let’s just consider this your last day. Oh by the way, you owe me money for that dental cleaning you did on your own cat so we’ll just take it out of your last check.”

Let me backtrack a few steps: I’m a licensed Veterinary Technician who graduated in 2009. I got not one, but two new jobs at the same time. One was for my local humane society which, unfortunately did not have an opening for a vet tech. So I took an adoption counselor job, which I still have so obviously I’m doing something right. The other was a vet tech (part-time) at a small, and I mean hole-in-the-wall, vet clinic. It was a bit overwhelming between both jobs, learning new skills at two different positions. It’s tough enough starting one new job, let alone two.

Fired & Replaced by Neice of Boss's Golf Buddy!

Fired & Replaced by Neice of Boss's Golf Buddy!


I should’ve known it was going to be all kinds of bad at my vet tech job. When I first started I was told I’d only be given 3 days of training. I was given six WEEKS at the humane society, and that was only for a crappy adoption counselor job. Is there something wrong with this picture? About six weeks into my vet tech position I was pulled into the office by the doctor. He explained that he wanted to see me take more initiative. Apparently I had not been vocal enough about my desire to be trained and he wanted to see me just “jump right in”, as he put it. Never mind that this was my very first tech job and he and his employees weren’t exactly falling all over themselves trying to get me practical experience.

Fast forward five and a half months. I’d been slowly getting into the groove, trying to carve a niche for myself as a useful (albeit inexperienced) technician. I’d gotten used to the routine and though I still needed practice with a lot of things, I felt that over time I would get it bit by bit. Not so fast! One Friday afternoon (note that you should not let go employees on a Friday, when they now have all weekend to do nothing but scheme about ways to exact their revenge), I was called upstairs by the doctor. Uh-oh; by now I’ve learned it’s never a good sign that the doctor wants to speak privately. Guess I was right. I sat there as he told me I was being dismissed, hardly able to keep myself from bursting into tears. The only thing I could do was to agree with everything he said. He was right after all: I did need more training (and if his staff had been willing to do it we wouldn’t have needed to have that discussion). All I could think about as I left that day was the mountain of bills I’d been slowly chipping away at over the past few months, and how I’d surely be maxing out all my available avenues of credit yet again. Luckily I was still employed at the humane society so I had a bit of a safety net there.

Fast forward about a year. Right around the beginning of the summer I ran into one of my former workmates, a highly trained, experienced technician who, you guessed it, was let go from the same place I was. She informed me that as soon as I left, I was replaced with a person who knew the good doctor. How’s that for favoritism?

Fast forward (I know, AGAIN?) another two months and lo and behold, I meet the girl who took my job. WOW. How’s that for fate? She showed up at the adoption shelter where I work and when I saw her place of employment listed on her application she was only too happy to talk about it. Of course she had no clue I was pumping her for information. Turns out she is the niece of the good doctor’s golf buddy. She graduated at exactly the same time I did and spent the first year afterward down at Disney World. That’s right: DISNEY WORLD. She interned (translation- worked for free) at the vet hospital in Animal Kingdom. Here’s the best part – they didn’t even let her do anything technician related. She got to be an assistant, that’s it. So she had no more technical experience than me. In fact, I even had MORE because I’d actually been working as a tech for six months.

I guess now I don’t feel so bad but I still managed to lose out because after all, I am the one who got canned.

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This post was submitted by Jenn.


Oct 14 2011

Story from the Great Depression

This is not my story. It is my Grandfather’s. It has come to me via my father, in one of those “You think this is bad? I’ll tell you bad..” stories.

During the early 1930’s my grandfather was working as a truck driver for Coca Cola in central Kentucky. He was married with two infant children, my dad and my uncle. The depression was not only causing a tremendous loss of jobs, it was causing something we have not seen: deflation. Manufacturers were cutting the cost of their products in a vain attempt to stimulate demand. The only way they could do this was cut wages. My grandfather had his meager wagers cut in half, to a level that could not sustain his young family. There was no second job to look for – he was lucky to have anything, and grateful to Coke that he was not let go. The one consolation was that everyone else around him was in the same boat.

In a time before unemployment assistance and >25% unemployment, how did they survive? The money was just enough to pay the rent and for food for the children. My grandmother and grandfather survived for several years on a garden my grandmother grew in a small backyard plot. She had a green thumb that not only fed them but provided enough extra that they traded vegetables for other staples they needed. My father recalls a time playing in the garden that kept them alive.

Times eventually got better and my grandfather rose in the company and eventually retired as a VP. Still, until my grandmother moved into an assisted living center in her early 90’s, she always had a garden, always canned fruits and vegetables and always saved for a rainy day.

So when I think about how bad it is now, I guess my Dad is right, it could be worse.

We can survive this Great Recession.

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This post was submitted by Roger.


Aug 31 2011

Longevity Doesn’t Pay

All my life I have always heard that longevity in a job shows you are stable and looks real good on your resume’. Well, I am a stable person by nature anyway, so staying at the same job is no problem for me. The problem is the career path I chose. Actually, I didn’t choose it, I fell into it quite by accident.

Way back in 1982, I saw a want ad published by a recruiter for a dental assistant for $15,000. I inquired about it and when I had the interview with the recruiter, all she talked about was a job with Loyola Federal as a mortgage processor for $6700.00. I asked what about the dental assistant job? She said, “oh, that’s not available”. So there goes my start in the mortgage business. I was only 17 at the time and still living at home, so I was not pressed to make a certain salary. Anyway, fast forwarding to 2011, I made an observation. I never lost a job the first 14 yrs in the mortgage industry. In the last 16 yrs., I have been laid off 4 times. I have now been laid off for 7 months. I am a mortgage underwriter and my 30 yrs of experience apparently is meaningless in this crappy economy.

In my most recent job, 4 out of 8 people in our MD office were laid off a week before Christmas and only 9 days after the company Christmas party. Real nice, huh? The rest of us were gone when office was shut down all together, which was no surprise. Problem that I see is that in the first 14 yrs. I never lost a job because I would leave a job before it got bad enough for offices to start closing. I would say safe zone was 2 – 3 years. So I have concluded that longevity in a job doesn’t pay. Keep on moving..

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This post was submitted by Irene .


Jul 28 2011

Not A Fit For Racial Profiling…

When I am home for the summer it is always near impossible to find employment. However, I responded to a Craigslist ad for a seasonal job, and I got an interview. The interview was with the owner of the boutique, and she said that the job would last until labor day. I was upfront and said I couldn’t work until then (because of school) and she said that she would discuss me with the manager. I was hired, even after expressing doubts, but the owner assured me that she needed me.


So I work for two months in the retail industry. However, the boss is very difficult. For instance, she wanted me to circulate the overall store more, but also pay specific attention to individual (white) customers in the fitting room. I was also told to watch the Hispanics and Muslims (don’t know how you can tell what religion people are by their looks) because they were prone to shoplift. Now I know what she was doing was wrong, but I kept the job because I really needed money. It did become stressful to work though. The owner kept giving me tasks and then changing her mind and holding me accountable. However, I did everything to please her.

After two months, the manager called me in after a shift and out of the blue and told me I was being let go. The reason? I wasn’t a right fit. I guess because I refused to racial profile, I did not belong. I’m glad I’m not a right fit because I’m not going to school to be a retail slave. However, I was upset to be let go. Now my boss used to hold a Cabinet position with the state so she is well published. After doing some research I found out that she didn’t pay income taxes because she often claims losses on her business. Funny how someone can cheat the system! Well I am unemployed but I guess I learned my lesson about working for horrible people.

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This post was submitted by EC.


Jul 20 2011

Creative Micro Systems is a Load(of Sh!t)man

Oh boy! Here we go again! I got laid off from another small company trying to act like a BIG company:

Creative Microsystems, they build on-board truck scales. Loadman is the name of the product.

BOY! Is it ever a LOAD man, a load of s**t!

My job was to build the arm and fork boxes that record the weight of the dumpster that the truck picks up, also I have to build the cables to go with this system, the person next to me builds the meters that the arm and fork, record the weight information too.

When I started there, my trainer, a few months later he quit to go be an electrician, well with the 4 months training I got I took it and tried my best to fill his shoes.

Mind you I was hired as an assembler, not a technician to make this stuff work.

Anyway, I thought that Chris was my supervisor, I could not find him in the company for five mins. to ask him a question on when I got stuck, so I went to the next person up, Larry, his attitude was “why are you bothering me with this?”, I guessed that your supposed to figure this stuff out yourself… ok, with no training manual or accurate diagram of the boards on question, I plowed on the best I could, with no guidance, but a drawn up book I made myself from some old notes of which that book vanished.

2 people came and went of who I trained of what I was given the material to work with…. are you dear reader confused yet?

so then we got a 3rd person in, Peg, I trained her up to what material I had, in fact I made a copy of my book to give to her (mistake on my part never should have copied that book! I did that at Newton, once that got their “training manual” they terminated me) She went ahead and built the arm boxes and the fork boxes, she said she would build the arms if I would build the forks that they were too hard.

Sounds ok, she was having as many if not more problems with the forks, that I was having problems with, also I was building the cables, and putting together manuals on how this stuff works. Also I had to test the boxes, before we potted them.

With the potting material, some times you get a bad bach, well most of them were bad of which I made the stuff work, but wrote a note that the material was bad.

No help there.

Pegs and my work was shipped, my forks were fine, pegs arms were having problems, and came back, who got the blame? ME! Not Peg oh no, she would get upset don’t do that, blame someone who did not build that arm.

Now before you accuse me, I watched her like a hawk to see what she was doing right and wrong before we potted the arm box. They worked like a charm! And so did my work!

SHIP IT!

The installers must have messed some thing up bad out there, the stuff failed in the field, who got the blame? ME!

Because I got laid off was because of the problems with the fork boards (I got no help with them) Chris all he could do was give me a smarmy smirk and say some thing negative to “help me”

IE: I asked him “Could you please print me a few labels”, “I gave you those yesterday”, “let me look… no none here”, “If I have time I will otherwise I do not, ask Larry”

Nice huh?

There is lots more, but I won’t get into it

So I am laid off, and the production person they have left, cannot lift 50 lbs+ to build the cables, she is fragile, and she claims that she was hired as a assembler not a technician. I am in the same boat. they wanted an assembler. well the unemployment just shot up to 10.2% Thanks to Chris at CMS, HAPPY?

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This post was submitted by MFX.



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